Charles39 medical history King39s cancer diagnosis comes after prostate surgery

Charles' medical history: King's cancer diagnosis comes after prostate surgery – and years of health problems, from chronic neck pain, broken ribs and “sausage fingers”

With King Charles III. has been diagnosed with cancer, the palace confirmed in a shocking announcement today.

It comes just days after the King was discharged from the London clinic where he underwent what is believed to be “routine treatment” for an enlarged prostate.

It is not related to his recent surgery and is not prostate cancer, but doctors discovered it when he underwent medical surgery for an enlarged prostate.

It is not the first time the 75-year-old king has suffered a health blow and has often joked about his physical decline.

He previously told a crowd in Brisbane in 2018: “I don't know about you, but bits of me keep falling off at regular intervals now.”

Here, Web lists some of Charles' known health problems that he has experienced over the years.

With King Charles III. has been diagnosed with cancer, the palace confirmed in a shocking announcement today

It is not related to his recent surgery and is not prostate cancer, but doctors discovered it when he underwent medical surgery for an enlarged prostate

It is not related to his recent surgery and is not prostate cancer, but doctors discovered it when he underwent medical surgery for an enlarged prostate.

Chronic neck and back pain

Prince Harry revealed in his memoir Spare that his father suffered from chronic neck and back pain.

The Duke of Sussex wrote in his sensational memoir that Charles struggled with “constant neck and back pain,” which he attributed in part to his old polo injuries.

Chronic back pain – described as aching, hot, burning, stabbing or stabbing pain – affects about one in 13 adults, according to data.

And eight out of ten people suffer from back pain at some point in their lives.

It can be caused by a number of factors, including a muscle strain, a herniated disc – when soft tissue between the bones of the spine bulges – and sciatica, a pinched nerve.

Charles himself suffered a herniated disc in the early 1990s, which caused him to miss the 1991 Royal Ascot. Two years later the injury worsened when he fell from his horse at Windsor.

He agreed to play only for charity after his doctor warned him that his condition could worsen if he continued to compete.

His typical gait – fingers linked behind his back – is considered a therapeutic trick to relieve his back pain.

The Duke of Sussex wrote in his sensational memoir that Charles struggled with

The Duke of Sussex wrote in his sensational memoir that Charles struggled with “constant neck and back pain,” which he attributed in part to his old polo injuries

King Charles winced in pain after a game of polo at Hurtwood Park in Surrey in 2004

King Charles winced in pain after a game of polo at Hurtwood Park in Surrey in 2004

Sausage fingers

King Charles' so-called “sausage fingers” have attracted a lot of attention from royal watchers over the years.

A doctor explained what could be the cause of King Charles' swollen fingers, for which the official medical term is dactylitis.

GP Chun Tang, medical director at Pall Mall Medical in Manchester, said: “There are numerous reasons why a person may suffer from 'sausage' fingers.”

“Swollen fingers are often a symptom of water retention, which can be caused by numerous health problems.” Sausage fingers are officially referred to as dactylitis.

“This condition arises from inflammation and can be a result of arthritis, multiple bacterial infections or even tuberculosis.”

“Other possibilities include high salt levels, allergic reactions, medical side effects, injuries and autoimmune diseases.”

“Treatment for this condition can be determined when the underlying cause is identified.” A blood test should be done to determine the underlying problems.

The royal has previously joked about the appearance of his hands, even referring to them as his “sausage fingers” in a letter to a friend describing his newborn son, Prince William.

But the king had large hands from a young age – a trait the queen wrote about in a letter to her music teacher after Charles' birth.

However, the king has never confirmed what the root cause of his predicament is.

King Charles' so-called

King Charles' so-called “sausage fingers” have attracted a lot of attention from royal watchers over the years

A doctor explained what could be the cause of King Charles' swollen fingers, for which the official medical term is dactylitis

A doctor explained what could be the cause of King Charles' swollen fingers, for which the official medical term is dactylitis

Non-cancerous growth

In 2008, King Charles underwent a minor procedure to remove a benign growth from his face.

Following surgery at his London residence, Clarence House, in May this year, the royal was seen with a small, hexagonal patch on the right side of his nose.

Clarence House would not go into details of what they described as a “minor surgical procedure”, saying only that it was “a routine and insignificant matter”.

Other members of the royal family have also been treated for facial growths in the past.

Charles' father, the Duke of Edinburgh, underwent a minor procedure in 1996 to remove a small, benign growth on his nose.

In January 2003, the Queen's surgeons also had smaller – non-cancerous – growths removed from her face.

Broken bones

Charles broke his right arm after falling from his horse during a game at Cirencester in 1990.

The accident in the second chukker was described by a spokesman as a “severe fracture above the right elbow”.

Charles, then 41, was cantering to cut off an opponent when his pony swerved to the right as he leaned forward to take a backhand shot. He lost his balance and staggered between the two animals, one of which kicked him in the arm.

The royal spent three nights in hospital and dismissed his injury as “stupidity”.

But the wound didn't heal properly and after three months of pain – and warnings that without treatment he could become so crippled that he would no longer be able to salute – he had to undergo surgery to heal the wound.

Bones were taken from his hip and packed around the fracture and a metal plate secured with screws. He was released from the hospital a week later and was back on the field within a year.

In 2008, King Charles underwent a minor procedure to remove a benign growth from his face

In 2008, King Charles underwent a minor procedure to remove a benign growth from his face

Charles broke his right arm after falling from his horse during a game at Cirencester in 1990

Charles broke his right arm after falling from his horse during a game at Cirencester in 1990

Charles fell awkwardly from his horse during a hunt in 2001 and broke his acromion, a small bone at the edge of the shoulder blade

Charles fell awkwardly from his horse during a hunt in 2001 and broke his acromion, a small bone at the edge of the shoulder blade

Years later, during a fox hunt in Derbyshire in January 2001, Charles' horse made an “unexpected leap” and knocked him to the ground.

He fell awkwardly and was believed to have dislocated his shoulder.

Royal protection officers who accompanied Charles on the Meynell hunt drove him to a nearby hospital – where an X-ray revealed that he had indeed broken the acromion, a small bone on the edge of the shoulder blade.

“He’s fine,” his spokesman insisted. “It was a minor injury and it's just inconvenient, that's all. “He's not in any pain.”

Charles had to wear a sling for several days while the fracture healed.

knee surgery

In 1998, Charles needed keyhole laser surgery to repair damaged cartilage in his right knee.

Several years earlier, he had the same operation on his left knee – the result of decades of hiking, skiing, polo games and a general refusal to sit still.

The operation resulted in him having to walk with a cane – but two days later, against the advice of his aides, he dropped it and resumed work with a full day of royal duties.

Scratched cornea

In November 2001, Charles arrived for royal duty wearing a rather worrying bandage over his left eye.

It turned out that the king had just sawed off a branch from a tree at Highgrove, his Gloucestershire estate, when he managed to get sawdust in his eye.

The dust scratched his cornea and temporarily impaired his vision. After treatment by a local doctor, he was referred to a specialist and given a day of rest.

A palace spokesman said his eye was “still hurting” a few days later when Charles proudly showed off his patch at a meeting of business leaders.

Broken rib

In January 1998, Charles was galloping through the Welsh countryside with the Wynnstay Hunt when he fell from his horse and broke a rib.

Despite his discomfort, the injury-prone royal insisted on hiking in the Himalayas a few weeks later as part of an official visit to Nepal and Bhutan.

In 1998, Charles needed keyhole laser surgery to repair damaged cartilage in his right knee

In 1998, Charles needed keyhole laser surgery to repair damaged cartilage in his right knee

In November 2001, Charles sawed a branch off a tree at Highgrove, his Gloucestershire estate, and got sawdust in his eye

In November 2001, Charles sawed a branch off a tree at Highgrove, his Gloucestershire estate, and got sawdust in his eye

Falling off the horse

In August 2001, Charles was thrown from his horse in a goal-scoring challenge during a charity match at Cirencester Park in Gloucestershire.

The headfirst fall left him unconscious and he was in danger of swallowing his tongue until a medic rushed onto the pitch.

Charles was carried away on a stretcher and some in the horrified crowd, which included supermodel Claudia Schiffer, later admitted they thought he was dead.

He was taken to Cirencester Memorial Hospital and then to Cheltenham General. Although injured and shaken, the then 52-year-old didn't break a single bone.

William and Harry, then 19 and 17 years old, also played and continued after their father's injury. Highgrove then won against local rivals Edgeworth.

Damaged larynx

In 1981, during a game, a stray polo ball – presumably hit by an overzealous opponent – flew straight into Charles' throat.

The incident left him out of breath and clutching his larynx.

Although he suffered no permanent damage, Charles lost his voice for ten days – leaving him unusually mute.

hernia

Charles underwent surgery in March 2003 for a hernia, which was reportedly caused by a gardening injury while working on the Highgrove site.

The condition, caused by a loop of intestine protruding through an abdominal muscle, caused Charles considerable pain – and subsequent surgery meant he had to cancel his annual ski holiday to Klosters, Switzerland.