Dave Hughes reveals possible health diagnosis that 39will impact his

Dave Hughes reveals possible health diagnosis that 'will impact his comedy'

Comedian Dave Hughes has revealed he may not have been diagnosed with ADHD.

During 2DAY FM's “Hughesy, Ed & Erin” breakfast show on Tuesday, the 53-year-old radio presenter said he may have the disorder after a fellow comedian with a diagnosis suggested he get tested.

“She said I should take ADHD medication because she thinks I have it,” he told fellow co-hosts Ed Kavalee and Erin Molan.

“She said she was recently diagnosed and the medication has improved her life immeasurably.” Since then, I've spoken to a number of comedians who were also diagnosed and they all rave about the medication and how they have improved their existence.”

Hughes noted that he doesn't know for sure whether he has ADHD or not. The radio team therefore invited the psychiatrist Dr. Tanveer Ahmed to discuss Hughes' possible diagnosis.

Comedian Dave Hughes (pictured) has revealed he may not have been diagnosed with ADHD

“I guess the question would be, let’s say, you’ve been diagnosed and you’re on medication. What are you trying to improve?” asked Dr. Ahmed.

Hughes explained his extensive professional background and how he failed his studies in two different areas.

“I started studying IT in 1989, but I couldn’t concentrate. I then studied business administration… I could have become an accountant. “I couldn’t concentrate,” he said.

“Are you saying that if I had had these medications back then, maybe I would have stayed at these levels?” he asked Dr. Ahmed.

During 2DAY FM's 'Hughesy, Ed & Erin' breakfast show on Tuesday, the radio host revealed he may have the disorder after a fellow comedian with a diagnosis suggested he get tested

During 2DAY FM's 'Hughesy, Ed & Erin' breakfast show on Tuesday, the radio host revealed he may have the disorder after a fellow comedian with a diagnosis suggested he get tested

“Well, there's a possibility…Sometimes with tablets there's an element of performance enhancement or a lot of people have trouble with these things,” Dr. replied. Ahmed.

“I’m worried about Hughesy moving on [the medication] and he’ll just be super relaxed… and that will affect his comedy.”

Hughes added: “Honestly, that's what I'm worried about.”

ADHD is a mental illness with symptoms such as difficulty concentrating, hyperactivity and impulsive behavior.

According to the Mayo Clinic, the disorder in adults is treated with medication and counseling, similar to childhood ADHD.

Hughes' health update comes after the comedian was hospitalized in December after dislocating his shoulder on a Queensland beach, causing nerve damage and causing him excruciating pain.

“Happy NY.” I had the least sober New Year’s Eve in over 30 years. “Green Whistle came in after two hours of the worst pain of my life, plus morphine and the rest,” he wrote on Instagram.

“Shoulder dislocation while surfing.” “Level 9 out of 10 nerve damage,” he explained.

“Thank you to my wife, @surfersparadiseslsc and the medical professionals at GC for their much-needed help!”

“I'll be in the sling for a while and I'm not sure when my next right-handed high five will be,” he continued.

In December, Dave was hospitalized after a surfing accident.  Pictured

In December, Dave was hospitalized after a surfing accident. Pictured

The 53-year-old dislocated his shoulder during a beach trip in Queensland, causing nerve damage and causing him excruciating pain

The 53-year-old dislocated his shoulder during a beach trip in Queensland, causing nerve damage and causing him excruciating pain

Alongside the caption, Dave shared several dramatic images of the aftermath of the accident.

He is seen bent over with his arm in a sling as he inhales the famous “green pipe” containing the powerful analgesic Penthrox, used to relieve pain in emergencies.

Another image shows the TV personality slumped in a dune buggy driven by a lifesaver, with a towel over her shoulders.

WHAT IS ADHD?

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a behavioral disorder characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity.

It affects about five percent of children in the United States. In the UK, around 3.6 percent of boys and 0.85 percent of girls suffer.

Symptoms typically appear at a young age and become more noticeable as the child ages. This can also include:

  • Constant fidgeting
  • Poor concentration
  • Excessive movement or talking
  • Act without thinking
  • Inability to deal with stress
  • Little or no sense of danger
  • Careless error
  • Mood swings
  • forgetfulness
  • Difficulty organizing tasks
  • Constantly start new tasks before completing old ones
  • Inability to listen or follow instructions

Most cases are diagnosed between the ages of six and twelve. Adults can also suffer from it, although there is less research on it.

The exact cause of ADHD is unclear, but it is believed to involve genetic mutations that affect a person's brain function and structure.

Premature babies and those with epilepsy or brain damage are at greater risk.

ADHD is also linked to anxiety, depression, insomnia, Tourette syndrome and epilepsy.

There is no cure.

To alleviate the symptoms and make everyday life easier, a combination of medication and therapy is usually recommended.

Source: NHS Choices