New York restaurant owners who have spent thousands on outdoor

New York restaurant owners who have spent thousands on outdoor sheds are condemning Eric Adams' crackdown on pandemic-era seating as new rules will replace almost ALL existing structures in favor of “lighter” setups

New York restaurant owners who have spent thousands on outdoor sheds have sharply criticized Eric Adams' crackdown on pandemic-era seating as new rules are set to eliminate almost all existing structures.

The new plan will eliminate shed-like outdoor dining structures and limit the time outdoor dining is allowed on New York streets.

The new program, called Dining Out NYC, was officially approved Friday and requires outdoor seating areas to have “lighter” setups that are “easily assembled and dismantled.”

Restaurants that use streets for outdoor seating are only allowed to remain open from April to November, while sidewalk dining areas can remain open year-round.

Many restaurants will now be forced to remove the buildings that have expanded their capacity and business in recent years – sheds that cost some establishments $25,000 or more to build.

Brianna, a manager at Little Ruby's Café in the East Village, told that the plan will cost the company “more to demolish and rebuild” because the outdoor seating area is currently a large, enclosed building with heating and windows is paneling and tasteful decor.

The new program, called Dining Out NYC, was officially approved Friday and requires outdoor seating areas to have “lighter” setups that are “easy to set up and take down”: Pictured: A rendering of the new requirements for outdoor seating

Little Ruby's Café in the East Village told  that the plan will cost the business

Little Ruby's Café in the East Village told that the plan will cost the business “more to tear down and rebuild.” Pictured: The restaurant's large enclosed outdoor structure

Under the new plan, outdoor cafes will be allowed to remain open year-round, but must have a perimeter around seating areas, awnings, umbrellas, lights, and sources of heating and cooling.  Pictured: an illustration for approved sidewalk structures

Under the new plan, outdoor cafes will be allowed to remain open year-round, but must have a perimeter around seating areas, awnings, umbrellas, lights, and sources of heating and cooling. Pictured: an illustration for approved sidewalk structures

She added that the new requirements were a real disappointment for the Australian cuisine restaurant, which has been using outdoor space year-round since the Covid-19 pandemic hit.

Restaurants interested in continuing to have outdoor seating in the Big Apple must apply. Applications are expected to be released in March and will be open until August 3rd.

Upscale restaurants will also be affected by the big change, such as the exclusive Italian restaurant Carbone in Greenwich Village.

The large, fenced-in outdoor dining area, adorned with a navy blue awning and red curtains, will no longer be permitted once the new guidelines take effect in March.

“The new program draws on lessons learned from the temporary outdoor dining program created during the COVID-19 pandemic, which saved 100,000 jobs across the city but led to quality of life issues as a subset of restaurant owners has been unable to maintain lax regulation.” “Outdoor dining,” says a press release from the mayor’s office.

The new “equity fee structures” will cost businesses an annual fee based on the length and width of their property’s sidewalk or roadway.

Upscale restaurants will also be affected by the big change, such as the exclusive Italian restaurant Carbone in Greenwich Village

Upscale restaurants will also be affected by the big change, such as the exclusive Italian restaurant Carbone in Greenwich Village

Kimura, a Japanese restaurant in the East Village, has been using this heated shed for outdoor dining since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic and said it also acts as extra seating for customers since their restaurant is tiny

Kimura, a Japanese restaurant in the East Village, has been using this heated shed for outdoor dining since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic and said it also acts as extra seating for customers since their restaurant is tiny

The construction of new enclosed buildings is not permitted and only areas with tables, chairs, umbrellas, covers, electrical connections, drainage and barriers may be created and made wheelchair accessible.

Optional outdoor additions include heating, cooling, lighting, privacy screens and flooring.

Outdoor facilities must also be equipped with proper drainage and barriers and must close operations at 12 a.m. instead of the usual 1 a.m.

Outdoor cafes must have a perimeter around seating, awnings and umbrellas. Lighting and heating and cooling sources are optional.

Takuya Shinohara, a manager at Kimura in the East Village, told that they weren't entirely sure what they would do with their shed outside once the new rules take effect.

While they wait to see what other businesses will do, Shinohara said the wooden shed has been in use since the start of the pandemic and provides additional seating for customers since the Japanese restaurant's interior is quite tight.

Another well-known restaurant, Old John's Luncheonette near Lincoln Square, also must decide what to do with its large, shuttered street restaurant.

Old John's Luncheonette near Lincoln Square also must decide what to do with its large, enclosed street restaurant, which cost about $20,000 to build

Old John's Luncheonette near Lincoln Square also must decide what to do with its large, enclosed street restaurant, which cost about $20,000 to build

Brianna, a manager at Little Ruby's Café, told  that the company spent a lot of time and money building its outdoor seating area, which has heating, lighting and decorations

Brianna, a manager at Little Ruby's Café, told that the company spent a lot of time and money building its outdoor seating area, which has heating, lighting and decorations

The New York Post reported in May that the retro restaurant's owner, Ricardo Palofox, said its 24 outdoor seats accounted for 40 percent of the restaurant's business.

He added the cabin-like fencing, which cost him about $20,000 to build, and if it's taken down they could “lose customers who came just for that.”

The new regulations are intended to create a “lighter” experience across the city.

“Between Dining Out NYC, our campaign to remove trash bags from New York City streets, our efforts to remove scaffolding that has stood for far too long, and the hundreds of millions we are investing in public projects across the city, “We are making fundamental changes the feeling of being out in New York,” Adams said in a statement.

Rosanna Scotto, the co-owner of Fresco by Scotto on East 52nd Street, told the New York Post that the new rules would represent a major financial setback for the restaurant's outdoor dining area.

The large $150,000 area called “Isle of Capri” was created in 2021 by Scotto and her sister Elaina.

“It's not only made of wood, but also metal and concrete.” “It has heaters, fans and flowers,” Scotto said.

Maureen Donohue-Peters, the owner of Donohue's Steakhouse on Lexington Avenue, said her 40-seat shed brought in 35 percent of the restaurant's sales.

“If I lost that and couldn’t bring it back into the restaurant, I would have to think about other options, including closing,” she said.